Clychau Eglwys Gadeiriol Tyddewi



The bells are housed in a detached tower which is part of the 13th century gateway known as Porth y Twr. They were hung here in the 1930s after an anonymus donor paid for the tower to be repaired and strengthened. The original bells had been hung in the tower of the cathedral but they were removed in 1730 because of the danger of the tower collapsing. The only mediaeval bell left is in the Exhibition in the Tower Gate. Perhaps some of the metal in the present fifth bell is also from the earlier ring. There are ten bells in the ring.

For most of the year, there is a handbell practice each week on Wednesday 7:45 to 9:00pm. For further information contact the Hand Bell Director, Melanie Northall, 01437-721890

The Tower bell practice is on Friday each week, 7:45 to 9:00pm. It is occasionally cancelled due to a concert in the cathedrail. Please contact John Davies, 07890-365778.

Visitors are welcome at all practices.

Sunday Service ringing times are 10:45 to 11:10am and 5:30 to 5:55pm

Requests to ring peals should be sent in writing to the Tower Captain Mr. John R. Davies at 48 Bryn Road St. Davids Pembs. SA62 6QU Wales U.K. giving as much notice as possible. The cathedral is a very busy place and we may have to revise arrangements to fit in with services set up at short notice. Fees for peal attempts are currently set at 60. Other bands who wish to do mixed ringing may also apply but charges will depend on length and type of ringing. Requests for peals or any other information about the bells may also be addressed to bells@stdavidscathedral.org.uk

The two new bells, donated by the American Friends of St. Davids Cathedral, which arrived in St. Davids in February 2001, were dedicated by the Bishop of St. Davids the Right Reverend Huw Jones at 1200 on St. Davids Day (March 1st.) Click here to see them

Name

 

Weight

 

 

 

Kgs

lbs

Dewi Sant (Saint David)

Tenor

122C

2700

Sant Mihangel (Saint Micheal)

9th

870

1900

Sant Iago (Saint James)

8th

560

1232

Deon (Dean)

7th

510

1120

Esgob (Bishop)

6th

407

896

Sant Andreas (Saint Andrew)

5th

356

784

Sant Stinan (Saint Justinian)

4th

270

594

Mair Fendigaid (Blessed Mary)

3rd

265

582

Sant Caradog (Sain Caradog)

2nd

278

611

Santes Non (Saint Non)

Treble

269

591

The beautiful sounds that are heard when church bells are calling the faithful to their prayers are only achieved with long practice and experience.

First it is necessary to learn bell control, that is to make sure that you are ringing the bell and not vice versa. Then comes rounds which means that the bells are ringing in order. In St. Davids we have ten bells so rounds go 12345678901234567890 etc. Next comes call changes in which pairs of adjacent bells are called to change their order. For example four to two would produce 12435678901243567890 etc. Plain hunting is the next stage and here at one command all the bells start moving in relation to one another as follows 1234567890 2143658709 2416385079 4261830597 4628103957 etc. I hope you can follow that.

Finally comes method ringing which in the years since its invention has lead to many books of compositions which are meant to tax the ringer and give the listener a pleasurable experience. Using one or more of these methods experienced ringers will attempt quarter or whole peals to celebrate particular events such as Royal Weddings or the Enthronement of a Bishop or even for fun. At about two and a half seconds per round a peal can take up to three and three quarters of an hour, for about 5040 changes, which is a lot of energy to expend and requires a great deal of concentration.

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